Training aids – Shox Box http://shox-box.com/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 06:28:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://shox-box.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-29T183654.200-150x150.png Training aids – Shox Box http://shox-box.com/ 32 32 DLIR Hosts In-Person Hawaii State Career Fair at Ke’ehi Lagoon https://shox-box.com/dlir-hosts-in-person-hawaii-state-career-fair-at-keehi-lagoon/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 04:42:00 +0000 https://shox-box.com/dlir-hosts-in-person-hawaii-state-career-fair-at-keehi-lagoon/ Published on November 14, 2022 in New DIRECTORATE OF LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS DAVID Y.IGEGOVERNOR ANNE PERREIRA-EUSTAQUIODIRECTOR FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASENovember 14, 2022 DLIR HOSTS IN-PERSON CAREER FAIR AT KE ‘EHI LAGOON Service priority for eligible veterans and spouses HONOLULU – The State of Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) today announced, in partnership […]]]>

Published on November 14, 2022 in New

DIRECTORATE OF LABOR AND INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS

DAVID Y.IGE
GOVERNOR

ANNE PERREIRA-EUSTAQUIO
DIRECTOR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
November 14, 2022

DLIR HOSTS IN-PERSON CAREER FAIR AT KE EHI LAGOON

Service priority for eligible veterans and spouses

HONOLULU – The State of Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations (DLIR) today announced, in partnership with Ke’ehi Lagoon Memorial, an in-person Hawaii State Career Fair Thursday, November 17, 2022, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Ke’ehi Lagoon Memorial. The fair is open to military veterans and eligible spouses from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. and to the public from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.

“State jobs that provide quality service to our public are in high demand and offer rewarding careers,” said Maricar Pilotin-Freitas, Workforce Development Administrator. “The state provides on-the-job training and professional development along with a competitive benefits package.”

The State of Hawaii welcomes applicants for a wide variety of cabinet positions. The fair will feature exhibitors from Hawaii State Executive Branch departments including the Department of Human Services, Department of Education, Department of Agriculture, Department of Health, Department Labor and Industrial Relations, and many others.

Job seekers who attend will have the opportunity to speak with potential employers and gather employment information directly from representatives of various state departments. People attending the fair are encouraged to come professionally dressed, with copies of their current resume.

For more information on this Hawaii State Career Fair, please contact Jarret Yip at 808-586-8825 or [email protected].

For more information on this and other DLIR events, visit: https://labor.hawaii.gov/wdd

This event is 100% funded by multiple grants from the US Department of Labor’s Employment and Training Administration, totaling $1,518,263 for O’ahu.

# # #

Check out DLIR’s press releases:
http://labor.hawaii.gov/blog/category/news/

Employer/Equal Opportunity Program
Auxiliary aids and services are available on request for people with disabilities.
TDD/TTY Dial 711 then ask for (808) 586-8866

Media Contact:
Bill Kustman
Ka`Oihana Pono Limahana
Department of Labor and Industrial Relations
(808) 586-8845
[email protected]
http://labor.hawaii.gov

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Disabled travelers say airlines too often damage wheelchairs https://shox-box.com/disabled-travelers-say-airlines-too-often-damage-wheelchairs/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 08:49:21 +0000 https://shox-box.com/disabled-travelers-say-airlines-too-often-damage-wheelchairs/ US airlines reported mishandling more than 800 wheelchairs in October, according to the Department of Transportation. Andrew Gurza’s wheelchair was left in the rain during his trip to San Francisco. The airline says it continues to work with Gurza to replace the chair. When Andrew Gurza traveled to San Francisco for the Cerebral Palsy Alliance […]]]>
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Partnership helps mental health services for 150 MT schools https://shox-box.com/partnership-helps-mental-health-services-for-150-mt-schools/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 22:30:00 +0000 https://shox-box.com/partnership-helps-mental-health-services-for-150-mt-schools/ Many small, rural and tribal schools in Montana will benefit from improved access to basic mental health services through a partnership made possible by a federal grant. The partnership between the Western Montana Professional Learning Collaborativea non-profit organization that provides professional development opportunities for educators, and the Montana Small School Alliancewill also provide rural schools […]]]>

Many small, rural and tribal schools in Montana will benefit from improved access to basic mental health services through a partnership made possible by a federal grant.

The partnership between the Western Montana Professional Learning Collaborativea non-profit organization that provides professional development opportunities for educators, and the Montana Small School Alliancewill also provide rural schools with violence prevention tools.

“There is a strong and growing need to improve and provide equitable school mental health support and other resources to prevent school violence and rural mental health issues,” said said Jessica Johnson of the Western Montana Professional Learning Collaborative.

According to the results of the 2021 Montana Youth Risk Behavior Survey, about 22% of high school students surveyed had seriously considered attempting suicide in the past year, and nearly 42% of students reported feeling sad or hopeless for two weeks or more. In addition, approximately 8.9% of students carried a weapon on them for more than one day during the past 12 months, apart from using the weapon for hunting or sport.

People also read…

Nearly 17,000 students from 98 percent of Montana schools between grades 7 and 12 participated in the survey conducted by the Office of Public Instruction during the 2020-2021 school year.

“Students are trained to run, hide or fight for their lives in school,” Johnson said. “We need to focus on an ongoing dialogue about improving student well-being with a greater focus on prevention. With this federal grant, we will seek to address the critical needs of rural, tribal, and border schools to better support our students.

Of the 150 school districts that are members of the Montana Small Schools Alliance, 120 of them operate without a single certified school counselor, according to a description of the project on the Justice Support Office website. As a result, one of the teachers in the school must undergo additional training in school guidance to fulfill these functions in addition to their responsibilities as an educator.

The $999,999 grant was awarded to nonprofit organizations in the Bureau of Justice Assistance’s STOP School Violence Program through the Department of Justice. Through the grant, the partnership aims to serve nearly 150 Montana schools through mental health assessments, counseling services, and enhanced content and curriculum.

The grant will also fund e-therapy assessments and treatment, direct access to CrisisTextLine, a mental health texting service, and fund a full-time credentialed school counselor to serve as a mental health resource navigator.

These additional resources for rural schools, which often struggle to hire counseling staff or contract services for student mental health issues, come at a time when many districts across the state are facing new challenges in providing their own programs.

Recent legislative changes Montana’s School and Community Treatment Programs (CSCT) have caused administrative headaches for many school districts and concerns about funding for these services in the future. CSCT programs connect students with severe mental health needs with them during the school day, in their homes or in the community.

The changes moved the curriculum from the Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services to the Office of Public Instruction and affected how school districts pay for their third party services. Previously, districts could pay their share by contributing classroom space or laptops. With the new rules, they have to pay in cash.

When the program was moved, lawmakers gave OPI $2.2 million to fill the schools’ funding gap, which expired at the end of December 2021.

Prior to the legislative changes, 84 districts contracted mental health services through CSCT programs. Only 10 school districts signed agreements to receive reimbursement from the federal government for their CSCT programs days before the February deadline.

Due to the changes, some districts chose to reduce their CSCT offerings or eliminate their programs altogether and instead transferred students to outpatient therapy.

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Texas revamps ‘active fire’ drills to minimize trauma https://shox-box.com/texas-revamps-active-fire-drills-to-minimize-trauma/ Sat, 29 Oct 2022 09:05:19 +0000 https://shox-box.com/texas-revamps-active-fire-drills-to-minimize-trauma/ AUSTIN — After Britt Kelly’s son participated in a lockdown drill two years ago in his Lamar kindergarten classroom, he had nightmares and wet his bed. Now 8 years old, he can only sleep with a light on. In August, the daughter of Mary Jackson, a kindergarten student in Leander, asked her mother to put […]]]>

AUSTIN — After Britt Kelly’s son participated in a lockdown drill two years ago in his Lamar kindergarten classroom, he had nightmares and wet his bed. Now 8 years old, he can only sleep with a light on.

In August, the daughter of Mary Jackson, a kindergarten student in Leander, asked her mother to put a “special lock” on her bedroom door to “keep the wrong adults out” following a a separate lockdown exercise.

Clay Giampaolo, a high school student with special needs, said that after drills at his school in Plano, he goes to the special education room to “cool down.”

READ MORE: Boerne ISD targets school safety and mental health after Uvalde

like the nation reassess its gun laws, violent threat training has become a gruesome but commonplace reality in K-12 schools. More than 40 states require schools to prepare students to respond when a campus is attacked. Almost all American students experience at least one or more of these exercises a year, although their effectiveness has been hotly debated by state lawmakers, school personnel, safety experts and parents.

About 98% of public schools taught students about containment procedures before the pandemic, according to the National Center for Education Statistics.

The reasons are clear: the 2020-2021 school year saw 93 school shootings resulting in casualties, the highest number in two decades, according to NCES. While school shootings are rare, they have devastating consequences.

But the preparations for these events can also come at a price. “The literal trauma caused just by them is horrific,” Giampaolo said.

According a study published in December in the journal Nature who reviewed social media posts.

The drills, especially those involving simulations, increased students’ fear of the possibility of a shooting and made them feel unsafe at school. The more realistic the exercise, the more fear it provoked. Students like Giampaolo who have special needs and those who have already suffered trauma are among the most affected, according to security experts.

At least one state is taking a step toward balancing school safety and student health.

In order to minimize trauma for participants, new texas regulations require schools to ensure exercises do not simulate shootings – a change that comes just a semester after a gunman killed 19 students and two teachers in Uvalde.

“If some kids come out traumatized or if we’re amplifying existing trauma, we’re not moving in the right direction,” said Nicole Golden, executive director of Texas Gun Sense, an advocacy group that has backed the bill.

Texas requires schools to conduct two lockdown drills per year. But there was confusion and sweeping interpretations about how they should be conducted, said state Rep. Claudia Ordaz Perez, a Democrat who sponsored the bill passed in the 2021 legislative session.

Despite a growing body of research on how to prepare for worst-case scenarios, not all schools follow best practices and there’s no way to tell which ones are, said Jaclyn Schildkrautassociate professor of criminal justice at the State University of New York-Oswego, who advocated for the exercises.

“We don’t have a national standard, no national guidelines, and no tracking system,” Schildkraut said.

In extreme cases, schools simulate shootings, with officers brandishing weapons or imitating gunfire, which she says is unnecessarily traumatic for students and staff. “We don’t set schools on fire to practice a fire drill,” Schildkraut said.

Texas rules now make a clearer distinction between lockdown drills, which are mandatory, and active threat drills, which are voluntary and may involve recreating aspects of a shootout.

A drill does not involve fake wounds or shots. Instead, students talk about what to do or do activities like turning off lights, locking doors, and staying quiet and away from windows.

Active threat drills, intended to train first responders, may involve realistic depictions of injured students or loud sounds. They give officials from different jurisdictions the ability to plan a coordinated response, said Kathy Martinez Prather, director of the Texas School Safety Center. But schools need to plan these simulations carefully without requiring student participation, she said.

The new regulations require schools to adapt drills and drills to the age and development of students, but focus on creating guardrails for active threat drills. Students are not prohibited from participating in drills, a gun safety movement, and wanted parent groups. But the rules advise schools to conduct them during a time when students are not on campus. They also require that everyone involved be informed well in advance of an exercise and that a public announcement be made immediately before, so that no participant confuses a simulation with a live shooter.

The measure, which also directs school districts to find ways to minimize potential trauma to students and staff, such as consulting mental health professionals when planning drills, was in effect during the school year. former. But the Texas Education Agency did not finalize the rules until this year.

The clarifications come as schools renew their focus on safety. “Especially anything that has come out of Uvalde, this legislation is more important than ever,” Ordaz Perez said.

The measure is a sign of incremental progress, but it’s not comprehensive, said Blair Taylor, an attorney with Moms Demand Action in Texas, a nonprofit that focuses on ending gun violence. She wants the Texas legislature to do more to prevent school shootings.

They’re “band-aids for bullet holes,” Taylor said. “We’re not addressing the real problem of easy access to guns and the toxic gun culture.”

The Texas American Federation of Teachers creates posters to make sure teachers know about the new rules, so they can file complaints with school districts. But Texas regulations do not specify punitive measures if districts do not comply.

The San Marcos Consolidated Independent School District has no plans to change how it conducts drills this year, said Doug Wozniakdirector of district health and safety services.

Once a semester, students must hunker down silently in a corner while first responders roam the halls and “give” the classroom doorknobs, he said. The officers then shout: “Police, open up”. Students with special needs are not exempt from these lockdown drills, he said, but officers are trying to check classrooms with those students first so they can quickly resume classes.

After the exercise, students, teachers and first responders gather in the cafeteria to debrief.

But even the shaking doorknobs might feel too much like a simulation for many students, especially those who are younger or have been through a shooting, some experts say.

When schools simulate any aspect of a shooting, it can potentially make students feel unsafe on school grounds, said Aurora Vasquez, vice president of policy. status and pledge for Sandy Hook Promise.

“Anxiety starts to sit with them on a regular basis when they go to school,” she said.

Texas limits the number of all types of drills school districts should do to 16 per school year, but many argue that lockdown drills don’t need to be done frequently.

“When you start doing these drills monthly, which some school districts require, it starts to suggest they’re relatively likely,” he said. David Schonfeld, director of the National Center for School Crisis and Bereavement at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles. “It’s a bad perception for children.”

Many students say the way Texas schools currently organize drills is having a lasting impact.

Jackson’s daughter is on the autism spectrum. Before August, she never worried about an intruder in her room. “She was never afraid of monsters; she was never afraid of the dark,” Jackson said. After that, that changed.

Between the Uvalde shooting and the regularity of the drills, Giampaolo said, he and many of his classmates are feeling uncomfortable at school this year. “We literally just want to go to school and not worry about being shot,” he said.

Kelly said she understood the need to prepare for school shooters, but it was difficult for her son.

“I don’t even know what the answer is, and I think that’s where I feel so helpless in this fight,” she said. “Children take the brunt of bad decisions.”


KHN (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism on health issues. Along with policy analysis and polls, KHN is one of the three main operating programs of the KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation). KFF is an endowed non-profit organization providing information on health issues to the nation.

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Diseases and Conditions of the Immune System – HIV/AIDS – InsuranceNewsNet https://shox-box.com/diseases-and-conditions-of-the-immune-system-hiv-aids-insurancenewsnet/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 21:56:08 +0000 https://shox-box.com/diseases-and-conditions-of-the-immune-system-hiv-aids-insurancenewsnet/ 2022 OCT 26 (NewsRx) — By a News Reporter – Staff News Editor at Daily Insurance News — New research on diseases and conditions of the immune system – HIV/AIDS is reported. According to news from Toronto, Canada, by NewsRx correspondents, the research said: “UNICEF estimates that there are up to 100 million street youth […]]]>

2022 OCT 26 (NewsRx) — By a News Reporter – Staff News Editor at Daily Insurance News — New research on diseases and conditions of the immune system – HIV/AIDS is reported. According to news from Toronto, Canada, by NewsRx correspondents, the research said: “UNICEF estimates that there are up to 100 million street youth (SIY) globally. Marginalized conditions put SIY at higher risk for HIV and adverse outcomes once HIV-positive.

Our news reporters got a quote from the research of the University of Toronto, “The objective of this review was to describe barriers and facilitators to accessing HIV prevention, testing and treatment services as part of Phase I of an implementation study evaluating the using peer navigators to increase access to HIV services. Semi-structured interviews, focus group discussions (FGD) and theater tests were conducted with people who identify as SIY, health care providers and community actors living in Canada (Toronto, Montreal, London) and Kenya (Eldoret, Huruma, Kitale). Data were analyzed using a content-directed approach guided by the socio-ecological model (SEM). The six sites had 195 participants: 64 SIYs, 42 health care providers and 97 community workers. Barriers were identified at the societal level (eg, intersectional stigma and discrimination), public policy (eg, insufficient access to basic needs, legal documentation, lack of health insurance and limited community funding), institutional (eg, lack of inclusive education and training). , inadequate HIV awareness and restrictive service delivery), interpersonal (e.g., ineffective communication by health care providers) and intrapersonal (e.g., lack of trust and associated fear, low perception of health care and lack of self-esteem). These have contributed to limiting the use of HIV services among SIY. Conversely, many enablers have also been identified at the level of public policy (e.g. affordable HIV services and treatment), institutional (e.g. available and accessible HIV prevention tools, education programs and HIV awareness, and holistic models of care), interpersonal (eg, support navigation systems, peer support, and personal relationships) and intrapersonal levels (eg, self-efficacy) as positively supporting the SIY access to HIV services. Intersectional stigma was a critical barrier in all sites, and policies and programs that promote welcoming environments for young people from diverse backgrounds and living conditions may better meet the HIV service needs of this high-risk population. .

According to the editors, the research concluded: “Social support and navigation services would facilitate access to HIV-related services at all sites.

For more information on this research, see: Barriers and facilitators to accessing HIV-related services for street-involved youth in Canada and Kenya. BMC Public Health2022;22(1):1901. BMC Public Health can be reached at: Bmc, Campus, 4 rue Crinan, London N1 9XW, England. (BioMed Center – http://www.biomedcentral.com/; BMC Public Healthhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcpublichealth/)

News correspondents report that additional information can be obtained from Katie MacEntee, Division of Epidemiology, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 155 College StreetM5T 3M7, Toronto, ON, Canada. Other authors of this research include Momina KhanRuben Kiptui, Amy Van Berkum, Abe OudshoornDavid O. Ayuku, Edith Apodi, Edward Ou Jin Lee, Alex Abramovich, Sue Ann MacDonald and Paula Braitstein.

The direct object identifier (DOI) for this additional information is: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12889-022-14290-7. This DOI is a link to a free or paid online electronic document, and can be your direct source for a journal article and its citation.

Journal editor contact details BMC Public Health is: Bmc, Campus, 4 rue Crinan, London N1 9XW, England.

(Our reports provide factual information on research and discoveries around the world.)

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How to Avoid the “White Savior Industrial Complex” https://shox-box.com/how-to-avoid-the-white-savior-industrial-complex/ Thu, 20 Oct 2022 17:57:00 +0000 https://shox-box.com/how-to-avoid-the-white-savior-industrial-complex/ Ten years ago, writer Teju Cole coined the term White Savior Industrial Complex to describe what he saw as the all-too-familiar pattern of privileged white people seeking personal catharsis by attempting to liberate, save, or otherwise uplift disadvantaged people of color. “The White Savior Industrial Complex is not a matter of justice,” Cole wrote in […]]]>

Ten years ago, writer Teju Cole coined the term White Savior Industrial Complex to describe what he saw as the all-too-familiar pattern of privileged white people seeking personal catharsis by attempting to liberate, save, or otherwise uplift disadvantaged people of color. “The White Savior Industrial Complex is not a matter of justice,” Cole wrote in a viral Twitter thread, which he later expanded into Atlantic. “It’s about having a great emotional experience that validates the privilege.”

I’ve been thinking a lot about Cole’s criticism lately. On the one hand, as a brown Muslim man from Iran, I know deeply about the White Savior industrial complex and the pernicious role it has played in my home country. On the other hand, my national hero and the subject of my new book, An American Martyr in Persiahappens to be a white evangelical man from Nebraska who went to Iran over a century ago to convert my countrymen to Christianity, that is, a literal white savior.

Howard Conklin Baskerville was a 22-year-old Christian missionary who traveled to Iran in 1907 to teach and spread the gospel. He arrived in the northwest city of Tabriz amid Iran’s first democratic uprising, the Persian Constitutional Revolution of 1906. (Iran’s strong culture of protest can be attributed, in part, to this revolution, whose legacy can be seen in the wave of social unrest currently sweeping the country.)

About a year earlier, a group of brilliant young arsonists, backed by the country’s merchants and clergy, had persuaded Muzaffar ad-Din Shah, Iran’s dying ruler, to sign a constitution guaranteeing the rights and privileges of his citizens. For a brief period, Iran was a self-determined constitutional monarchy with free elections and an independent parliament. But when Muzaffar ad-Din died, the throne passed to his son Mohammed Ali, who destroyed the constitution and attacked the building where Parliament met. The new shah then ordered his soldiers to seize Tabriz, the last city where the revolution was still flourishing and where Baskerville had recently arrived.

Baskerville could not stand aside as a civil war raged around him. He gave up his duties as a missionary and teacher, renounced his American passport and took up arms. On April 20, 1909, he and his students attempted to force their way through the blockade to bring food to starving Tabrizis. Baskerville was shot through the heart and killed.

Baskerville’s death seemed to empower the revolutionaries, who overcame the shah’s siege and headed for Tehran. Once there, they deposed Mohammed Ali Shah. Soon the constitution was restored and a new Parliament installed, which immediately honored Baskerville.


I have known the story of Howard Baskerville most of my life. In Tehran, where I grew up, streets, schools and cafes were named after him. His willingness to sacrifice his life for freedom in a foreign land not only made him a hero in Iran; it has long inspired my own activism. But when I sat down to write his biography, I was immediately confronted with Cole’s essay. After all, the story of a privileged, Princeton-educated white Christian who traveled thousands of miles from his home to save the souls of people he called “Mohammedans” seems to have all the hallmarks of the white savior trope.

Yet the more I delved into Baskerville’s life, the more it seemed to me like some sort of antidote to the White Savior Industrial Complex. Of course, Cole wasn’t suggesting that white people should never try to help those of a different skin color. But Baskerville’s actions in Iran offer a set of guiding principles for how privileged white people can intervene in the world – whether volunteering after a natural disaster, providing aid during a humanitarian crisis, or even interceding on behalf of those seeking freedom from oppression – while avoiding the white savior trap.

1. Listen before you act.

Cole’s main concern with the white savior is how often he strips people of color of their agency, making them passive recipients of white benevolence. “Those who are helped should be consulted on matters that affect them,” he wrote.

Baskerville was sent to Iran by the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions with explicit instructions to ignore the social and political situation in the country and focus entirely on saving souls. And that is, indeed, what he did during his first year in Tabriz.

But then he stopped talking at Tabrizis and started listening to them instead. He read the history of Persia and spoke with important revolutionaries. Between lessons, he brought food to the soldiers and listened to their stories. And he started asking his students questions about what they were seeing and experiencing in the city.

What he discovered was that people had far more urgent and immediate needs than hearing the gospel. They needed food, not faith; protection, not evangelism. “I cannot continue to teach calmly and quietly while tragic events are happening daily around me,” he told his superiors. He left his post, took a rifle and joined his students on the battlefield.

2. Connect the dots.

The White Savior Industrial Complex enables privileged white people to ward off systemic racism, injustice, and corruption in favor of individual acts of charity. Yet, by refusing to acknowledge and understand the power patterns that lie behind many humanitarian disasters, the white savior may actually be helping to perpetuate the problem – obscuring the disease by simply band-aiding particular symptoms.

Howard Baskerville’s fellow missionaries were not immune to the suffering endured by the Tabrizi as a result of the terrible famine that gripped the city during the Shah’s siege. What set Baskerville apart, however, was that he recognized that the problem in Iran was not just one evil monarch. It was the monarchy itself. A tyrant who has the power to violently crush the popular will whenever it suits him cannot simply be thwarted by charity and good works; it must be overthrown.

There is great symbolism in the fact that while his colleagues were trying to ameliorate the effects of the siege of Tabriz by sharing the food they had with the starving populace, Baskerville set out to break the siege himself.

3. Know where to assign blame.

To truly do good in the world without perpetuating the White Savior industrial complex, you have to look critically inward and recognize the role your own country might play in perpetuating the injustice you seek to correct. When Baskerville went to Iran, he saw the United States as a beacon of freedom whose light would one day shine in every dark and broken corner of the globe.

Yet it didn’t take him long to grasp the reality of American interests abroad. The State Department wrote in a memo that the United States could “not become aware of any subversive movement” in Persia. Feelings like this infuriate Baskerville. He believed that democracy should be universal, not just for Americans.

“I’m an American citizen and I’m proud of it,” Baskerville said, “but I’m also a human being and I can’t help but feel deep sympathy for the townspeople.” Rather than heed requests from the U.S. government and the mission board that it stop interfering, Baskerville simply surrendered his passport.

4. Sacrifice your privilege.

Perhaps Cole’s most astute observation about the White Savior industrial complex is that it reinforces white privilege. No matter how badly the security situation deteriorated in Tabriz, as an American, Baskerville knew he would always have a powerful force to protect him. Before he surrendered his passport, he knew it would protect him from harm.

What his passport couldn’t do, however, was protect him from witnessing the atrocities unfolding around him. Baskerville saw how the city he had come to call his own was repeatedly attacked by the agents of oppression. It was precisely his refusal to look the other way that ultimately compelled him to sacrifice his privilege by renouncing his American citizenship.

When the American consul general in Tabriz came to the parade ground where the revolutionaries were training to give Baskerville one last chance to retain his citizenship, Baskerville refused: “The only difference between me and these people is the place of my birth”. he said. “And that’s not a big difference.”

5. Be ready to be saved yourself.

No matter what good Baskerville sought to do as a missionary, one cannot lose sight of the fact that he was there first and foremost to bring salvation to Persia. Yet, in the end, it was Baskerville himself who was saved.

The evangelical Christianity he had come to preach in Tabriz was mostly concerned with individual salvation, requiring nothing more than accepting Jesus Christ as one’s personal savior. For the Tabrizi, however, salvation did not lie in adhering to one set of beliefs or another, but rather in the willingness to act on those beliefs, to sacrifice everything for them.

This truth dawned on Baskerville as he gradually recognized that the passive Christianity he had brought with him could not be reconciled with the reality of his experience in Tabriz. He was still a Christian, but he came to understand his faith in a different light. He started acting on his beliefs, rather than talking about them. In other words, Baskerville may have come to Iran to teach the Persians what it means to be American and Christian. But by taking up their cause, he allowed the Persians to teach him what it means to be both.

Although public memory of Baskerville has rapidly faded in Iran since the 1979 revolution, it is because of his actions that he is still remembered today not as another white savior seeking emotional validation, but as a hero and a martyr. His legacy shows that resisting the White Savior industrial complex is about the conscious choices one makes. It’s about using your actions to challenge white dominance, rather than uphold it.

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180th Fighter Wing Conducts Aircraft Recovery Training Air National Guard Article Display https://shox-box.com/180th-fighter-wing-conducts-aircraft-recovery-training-air-national-guard-article-display/ Tue, 18 Oct 2022 14:01:46 +0000 https://shox-box.com/180th-fighter-wing-conducts-aircraft-recovery-training-air-national-guard-article-display/ SWANTON, Ohio — U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the Ohio Air National Guard’s 180th Fighter Wing and 200 Squadron RED HORSE worked together for a crashed damaged/disabled aircraft recovery training event on the 23rd and April 24, 2022, in Swanton, Ohio. “CDDAR training includes both classroom training and hands-on training that allows […]]]>


U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the Ohio Air National Guard’s 180th Fighter Wing and 200 Squadron RED HORSE worked together for a crashed damaged/disabled aircraft recovery training event on the 23rd and April 24, 2022, in Swanton, Ohio.

“CDDAR training includes both classroom training and hands-on training that allows Airmen to practice other aircraft lifting and towing procedures,” said Senior Master Sgt. Jeff Axe, a phase maintenance dock supervisor assigned to the 180FW. “This includes lifting an aircraft with inflatable lifting bags, lifting with a sling and crane, pulling an aircraft that may be stuck, and recovering and mitigating composite materials.”

CDDAR is a critical capability and allows Airmen to respond to aircraft emergencies when needed. Although RED HORSE, a self-sustaining, highly mobile, and rapidly deployable civil engineer response force, is a separate squadron located in Port Clinton, Ohio, joint training exercises build partnerships and ensure Airmen are prepared to react at any time.

“If a pilot declares an in-flight emergency, the CDDAR team assembles and prepares to handle the emergency once the plane is on the ground,” Ax said. “This could include something as simple as towing the aircraft back to the flight line once it lands safely, or in the worst case, responding to a crashed aircraft. In-flight emergency, the long, loud siren on base is activated.This is the indicator that lets everyone know there is an emergency and allows the CDDAR team to assemble.

The team is comprised of Airmen from across the maintenance group, including electricians, outings, weapons, avionics, aerospace ground equipment, engine shop, quality assurance and more .

“The team is a mix of specialized and diverse skills, ready and able to respond to any aircraft recovery scenario,” Axe said. “There are currently seventeen core team members and sixteen additional members.”

Realistic training relies on diverse groups working together, ensuring they are ready to react to a real scenario if an aircraft crashes or becomes disabled.

“The CDDAR capabilities exercise prepares Airmen to effectively recover aircraft, allowing flight operations to resume as quickly as possible,” Ax said. “In addition, it is the responsibility of CDDAR teams to retain evidence of the incident should an investigation be required. It is important that as the aircraft recovery operation progresses, any evidence of what may have caused the incident is preserved. Crash Preservation The site helps the investigation team determine what happened and may help prevent future similar incidents.”

During the two-day training event, Airmen successfully recovered an F-16 Fighting Falcon and an F-84, used to introduce variety.

“The practice has been great for us as well as for RED HORSE,” Ax said. “We were able to develop essential skills and establish cooperation in the event of real-world operation. We achieved all the objectives that we set for the training event.”



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Every main protagonist in the franchise and their final fate https://shox-box.com/every-main-protagonist-in-the-franchise-and-their-final-fate/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 00:15:00 +0000 https://shox-box.com/every-main-protagonist-in-the-franchise-and-their-final-fate/ This article contains mentions of sexual assault, kidnapping and murder The recent release of Halloween ends seems to have finally brought about the conclusion of the epic saga of Michael Myers and the bloody history behind it. Unlike most horror franchises, the Halloween The series has a very complex and convoluted timeline, in which only […]]]>

This article contains mentions of sexual assault, kidnapping and murder

The recent release of Halloween ends seems to have finally brought about the conclusion of the epic saga of Michael Myers and the bloody history behind it. Unlike most horror franchises, the Halloween The series has a very complex and convoluted timeline, in which only certain films connect with others, and in which plot elements of some contradict or entirely reenact others.


Throughout these various films, many different protagonists have stood up and fought with the sadistic force known as Michael Myers (or in one case clashed with killer Halloween masks) and while some survived the horrific ordeal and got a happy ending, others weren’t so lucky.

VIDEO OF THE DAY

This article contains spoilers for all movies in the Halloween franchise, including the recent release Halloween ends!


Laurie Strode – It’s Very Complicated

As mentioned earlier, the Halloween franchise returns again and again to its films and the fate of its characters. No character suffers more than the franchise’s central protagonist, Laurie Strode. Although she initially survives her encounter with Michael Myers on Halloween night, as shown in the first two films, she is not so lucky in the following two timelines.

RELATED: Laurie Strode’s 10 Most Memorable Halloween Quotes, Ranked

Laurie is killed off-screen in timeline 4-6 after a fatal car accident. Regarding the H20Resurrection timeline, it’s sadly the one where Michael finally got his wish, killing Laurie in her mental institution. As it stands, however, Laurie Strode is enjoying a happy ending with the conclusion of the most recent trilogy, having survived the events of Halloween ends and ultimately killed Michael once and for all.

Dr Samuel Loomis – It’s also very complicated

The third pillar of Halloween franchise alongside Laurie and Michael, Dr. Samuel Loomis was Michael’s former psychiatrist and the secondary protagonist of films 1 through 6 (with the obvious exception of 3). His first death occurs Halloween 2 in one of the franchise’s most memorable moments when he sacrifices himself to kill Michael in a burst of fire.

Films 4-6 establish that Michael and Loomis survived the explosion, causing the pair to fight again over the next few years until Loomis stumbles upon an unknown, but clearly agonizing fate at the end of Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers. The most recent trilogy establishes that Loomis died of natural causes early on, with his successor ironically being the one who set Michael free.

Dr. Dan Challis – Unknown

Dr. Dan Challis only appears once in the franchise and specifically in the only movie that has no connection to Michael Myers. However, that’s not to say Dan had an easy time on Halloween night at Halloween III: Season of the Witchas he came face to face with pagan rituals and murderous androids.

After uncovering a sinister plan involving microchips in children’s Halloween masks that is set to cause a gruesome death toll after an ad airs, Dan is able to kill the perpetrators and destroy their factory, walking out of the world alive. carnage. Unfortunately, while he is able to stop two airings of the ad, he is unable to stop the third, leaving his fate amid impending horror that will become unknown.

Rachel Carruthers – Deceased

With Laurie Strode who died in a car accident at the start of Halloween 4: The Return of Michael Myers, Michael moves to target Laurie’s orphaned daughter, Jamie, who now lives with the Carruthers family. Rachel is Jamie’s adopted sister and cares for her immensely, reiterating to Jamie how much she loves him whether they are blood related or not.

Related: Every Movie In The Halloween Franchise, Ranked By Letterboxd

She succeeds in protecting Jamie from Michael in the film and helps the angry mob kill Michael at the end of the film. Unfortunately, Michael would survive this encounter, and surprisingly early in Halloween 5: The Revenge of Michael Myershe stabs Rachel to death with a pair of scissors.

Jamie Lloyd – Deceased

Orphaned daughter of Laurie Strode and central protagonist of the 4-6 timeline, Jamie Lloyd sadly suffers the brunt of the franchise’s most shocking twists. Being viciously hunted by her murderous uncle Michael Myers in Halloween 4 damages Jamie’s sanity, so much so that she slaps and stabs her adoptive mother.

Having become mute after the ordeal, she is tracked down again by Michael in Halloween 5 and is eventually kidnapped by the Man in Black (who frees Michael from prison). Held captive for six years and impregnated with Michael’s baby by the cult of Thorn, Jamie escapes with her child at the start of Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers. Unfortunately, she is killed by Michael, who then sets his sights on his child.

Kara Strode – Alive

Cousin of Laurie Strode, Kara Strode only appears in Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers and because of this, claims to be one of the few characters in the franchise to have an unambiguous “alive” status. Even with just one appearance, her survival is a pretty impressive feat when you consider what she endures throughout the film.

Her family is murdered by Michael Myers, her son is almost selected for the “curse of Thorn” by the cult of Thorn, and then she is kidnapped by that same cult. Yet she and Tommy Doyle are not only able to incapacitate Michael Myers, but also save and leave with all the children in their care (including Jamie’s baby and son).

Tommy Doyle – It’s a bit complicated

Like Laurie and Loomis, Tommy Doyle has a few different fates throughout the franchise, though his own is considerably less complicated to follow due to his fewer appearances on the show. As a young child guarded by Laurie Strode, he survives the events of the original Halloween film, which is true of his two subsequent appearances.

He reappears for the first time as a young adult in Halloween: The Curse of Michael Myers, the one who became obsessed with the legend of Michael Myers. This Tommy survives his encounter with the mass murderer, able to save Kara Strode and beat Michael unconscious. However, the older Tommy who appears in the most recent timeline with halloween kills isn’t so lucky, becoming one of Michael’s many victims after leading an angry mob in a failed attack on the faller.

Freddie Harris and Sara Moyer – Alive

When Michael Myers finally succeeds in killing Laurie Strode in Halloween: Resurrection, he turns to murdering the stars and producers of a reality show set in his childhood home. Michael slaughters a large majority of the cast and crew, leaving only a contestant named Sara and one of the show’s directors, Freddie.

Just as Michael is about to kill the couple, Freddie, played by rapper Busta Rhymes, electrocutes the killer, allowing him and Sara to escape as Michael presumably burns to death. It was the last film in the established timeline in H20which means that the pair of Freddie and Sara never had to suffer any sequels in which Michael could have exacted revenge.

Karen Nelson – Deceased

When the new trilogy of films beginning with Halloween (2018) have been released, one of the biggest changes to the Halloween mythos was the addition of Laurie’s new daughter, an only child named Karen. Karen would develop a strained relationship with Laurie as an adult, largely because she was taken away by child protective services at age twelve due to Laurie’s paranoia caused by Michael and his extremely rigorous to prepare Karen for such an attack when she was a child.

Related: Michael Myers’ 10 Most Shocking Halloween Kills

However, Michael of course returned and, thanks to Laurie’s training, Karen was able to lure Michael into a trap and shoot him. Unfortunately, Karen wouldn’t fare as well as in halloween killsas after Michael survived the violent mob Karen led him to, he repeatedly stabbed her to death in Judith Myers’ old bedroom.

Allyson Nelson – Alive

Daughter of Karen Nelson and granddaughter of Laurie Strode, Allyson unfortunately inherited the family tradition of having to desperately fight for her life against Michael Myers on Halloween night. Michael’s comeback in 2018 saw tragedy surround Allyson at every turn and take the lives of her best friends, her boyfriend and ultimately both of her parents.

After continuing his life four years later in Halloween ends, she is unfortunately drawn into the bloodshed again, thanks to a combination of Michael’s reappearance and her new boyfriend Corey’s murder spree. Both murderers end up dead, however, with Allyson helping her grandmother kill Michael once and for all – which ultimately allows Alyson to leave Haddonfield and move on with her life.

Next: Every Main Character In Halloween (1978), Ranked By Intelligence

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An intergenerational collective of African women leaders champions the role of young women in the global response to HIV https://shox-box.com/an-intergenerational-collective-of-african-women-leaders-champions-the-role-of-young-women-in-the-global-response-to-hiv/ Thu, 13 Oct 2022 14:14:00 +0000 https://shox-box.com/an-intergenerational-collective-of-african-women-leaders-champions-the-role-of-young-women-in-the-global-response-to-hiv/ His Excellency Kassim Majaliwa Majaliwa, Prime Minister of the United Republic of Tanzania, delivered the opening address. Participants joined in person and online from 15 African countries where girls and young women experience disproportionately high rates of new HIV infections. Sima Bahous, Executive Director of UN Women; the Honorable Donald J. Wright, United States Ambassador […]]]>

His Excellency Kassim Majaliwa Majaliwa, Prime Minister of the United Republic of Tanzania, delivered the opening address. Participants joined in person and online from 15 African countries where girls and young women experience disproportionately high rates of new HIV infections. Sima Bahous, Executive Director of UN Women; the Honorable Donald J. Wright, United States Ambassador to Tanzania; The Honorable Dorothy Gwajima, Tanzanian Minister of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elders and Children, was among the other dignitaries present.

This intergenerational, cross-sector, and transnational leadership meeting was supported by the US President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and resulted in a set of recommendations for policymakers to take forward. The recommendations focused on ways to reduce the alarming incidence of HIV among adolescent girls and young women in sub-Saharan Africa and increase their access to HIV prevention and treatment services.

“Today marks the beginning of a new milestone in women’s leadership in the fight against HIV and AIDS,” said Ms. Sima Bahous, Executive Director of UN Women. “By bringing together established and emerging women leaders across Africa, and with the support of partners, this intergenerational collective of African women leaders will ensure that the voices of women of all ages inform decision-making around the response to HIV. . This is essential to ensure that the HIV response in the future meets the needs of all, including young women.

In sub-Saharan Africa, every two minutes, an adolescent girl or young woman was newly infected with HIV in 2021 alone, or about 4,900 new infections every week.

“To end the HIV/AIDS pandemic, we must address the inequalities in prevention, care and treatment, education, economic and other that make adolescent girls and young women vulnerable,” said the Dr. John Nkengasong, who oversees PEPFAR. “Through programs like DREAMS, we can expand our efforts to empower adolescent girls and young women and build partnerships at the community level to increase our efforts to remove barriers that put them at higher risk of contracting HIV. At PEPFAR, we are increasing our investment to close known gaps in HIV prevention services for adolescent girls and young women by nearly 20% in FY2023. PEPFAR cannot do this alone and that is why our partnerships with UN Women, UNAIDS, the Global Fund, partner countries, communities, among other key partnerships, are so critical. We are all engaged in a collective and coordinated response.

The disproportionate vulnerability to HIV infection of adolescent girls and young women is due to persistent gender inequalities, stigma and discrimination, gender-based violence, child marriage, unpaid care responsibilities and other inequalities that hinder young women’s access to HIV prevention and treatment services, coupled with barriers to education and employment opportunities. The COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated these factors and put girls at even greater risk.

The high-level meeting in Tanzania is part of a UN Women program supported by PEPFAR to provide leadership, training and mentorship opportunities to empower young women and increase their access to decision-making spaces. decision-making in the response to HIV. Over the past year, nearly 200 women aged 18 to 24 from 15 countries have received training.

“Mentoring is a key ingredient in developing strong leaders,” said the Hon. Dorothy Gwajima, Tanzanian Minister of Health, Community Development, Gender, Elders and Children. “Many of these young women will one day be in our shoes and occupy positions of influence. As established leaders, we need to open doors and invest in building their skills and confidence so they can bring about positive change in their communities and countries.

Participants at the high-level meeting used the hashtag #takethelead to raise awareness through social media. They called for the active participation of young women in decision-making regarding the response to HIV and beyond. They stressed the importance of joint efforts with established leaders to promote women’s rights.

“It is time for young women to take the lead and make their voices heard so that we can influence decisions on HIV-related policies, programs and budgets,” said Rahma Seleman Jumanne, youth advocate from Tanzania. “It’s very powerful for us young leaders to see so many established government leaders stand with us and call for change.”

Other partners supporting the meeting in Tanzania included the African Women Leaders Network, the United Nations in Tanzania and the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS). The countries represented by the women leaders were: Botswana, Cameroon, Ivory Coast, Eswatini, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Rwanda, South Africa, Tanzania, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

About UN Women

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Local Career Center to move https://shox-box.com/local-career-center-to-move/ Mon, 10 Oct 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://shox-box.com/local-career-center-to-move/ The NCWorks Surry County Career Center will begin operating Oct. 17 from this location at 942 W. Pine St. in Mount Airy, formerly home to a Farm Bureau insurance agency. A local operation helping job seekers is on the move, but just a short distance from the current location of NCWorks Surry County Career Center […]]]>

The NCWorks Surry County Career Center will begin operating Oct. 17 from this location at 942 W. Pine St. in Mount Airy, formerly home to a Farm Bureau insurance agency.

A local operation helping job seekers is on the move, but just a short distance from the current location of NCWorks Surry County Career Center in Mount Airy.

The center’s new digs are at 942 W. Pine St. in a building formerly occupied by the Farm Bureau near the CF Jones Classic Cafe. It is less than a mile from the existing 541 W. Pine St./Suite 300 facility which is near the Mill Creek General Store.

Officials say a week-long closure of the NCWorks Career Center will accompany the move, which was announced Thursday by the Kernersville-based Piedmont Triad Regional Workforce Development Council.

The center will close on Monday and remain inactive until it reopens on October 17 at the new location.

Those who need to access services during this time can contact the Forsyth County NCWorks Career Center at 336-464-0520 or online at www.NCWorks.gov, for assistance Tuesday through Friday.

Application for workers

When asked Thursday afternoon what made the move easier, Tammy Caudill, Strategic Initiatives Coordinator for the Piedmont Triad Regional Council, said it was related to space — related to increased demand for center services and the need to better respond to them.

“With the ongoing labor shortage, businesses need more help recruiting qualified employees,” said Caudill, whose role on the board is to work on behalf of member communities, including Mount Airy. and Surry County.

Many services are available to job seekers at NCWorks that help fill this job gap.

“NCWorks is doing more to help solve this problem than just placing individuals in jobs,” Caudill added.

For those eligible, funding is available for training programs to prepare them for the jobs most needed, she mentioned of one.

“Many of the services available through NCWorks are available to all citizens of North Carolina,” Caudill advised. “Some people don’t know that these benefits are available to them for free through the NCWorks Career Center.”

Caudill has pointed out in the past that some people don’t know that an individual doesn’t need to be unemployed to use many of NCWorks’ services.

In the 2021/2022 program year (June 30, 2021 to July 1, 2022), Surry County NCWorks Career Center provided nearly 21,500 services to 3,840 people, according to the Strategic Initiatives Coordinator.

“We hope to serve even more people at the newly renovated Career Center and continue to help bridge the gap between the workforce and the needs of local businesses.

This was echoed by career center director Beverly Frey, who said staff were eager to begin offering employment services in the new location.

“Over the past few months, work has been done to renovate the facility and we are delighted to have people visiting us there,” Frye said in a statement.

“We are proud of the work done by all of the NCWorks Career Centers in our seven-county region,” Executive Director Wendy Walker-Fox of the Piedmont Triad Regional Workforce Development Council said in a statement. communicated. “We look forward to the opening of the new NCWorks Career Center in Surry County and are grateful to the staff at Forsyth County Career Center for helping to serve customers during the move.”

A grand opening is planned at the new location on a date yet to be announced.

Tom Joyce can be reached at 336-415-4693 or on Twitter @Me_Reporter.

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