Training plan – Shox Box http://shox-box.com/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 09:45:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://shox-box.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-2021-06-29T183654.200-150x150.png Training plan – Shox Box http://shox-box.com/ 32 32 Clinical Trials Coordinator – VIRUTUBISHO Trial – Kenya https://shox-box.com/clinical-trials-coordinator-virutubisho-trial-kenya/ Wed, 03 Aug 2022 09:04:03 +0000 https://shox-box.com/clinical-trials-coordinator-virutubisho-trial-kenya/ OBJECTIVE OF THE POSITION: Plan, implement and coordinate clinical research operations in the Maternal and Child Nutrition Research Group of KWTRP Kilifi/Coast. The post holder will be responsible for managing a community-based clinical trial of multiple micronutrient supplementation for women of reproductive age (non-pregnant and pregnant) in Kilifi County (VIRUTUBISHO trial). The incumbent must have […]]]>

OBJECTIVE OF THE POSITION:

Plan, implement and coordinate clinical research operations in the Maternal and Child Nutrition Research Group of KWTRP Kilifi/Coast. The post holder will be responsible for managing a community-based clinical trial of multiple micronutrient supplementation for women of reproductive age (non-pregnant and pregnant) in Kilifi County (VIRUTUBISHO trial). The incumbent must have experience in leading research teams and be highly autonomous in managing complex clinical trial research work. The role is mentally demanding, involves attention to detail and deadlines, and strong engagement with stakeholders.

REPORTING LINES:

  • Principal investigator of the VIRUTUBISHO trial.

BUDGET RESPONSIBILITY:

  • Budget planning, oversight, monitoring and reporting responsibilities

WORK DIMENSIONS:

The KEMRI-Wellcome Trust Research Program (KWTRP) is a world-renowned research institution in Kenya that conducts studies of public health interest. An area of ​​great public health interest is maternal and child nutrition research that aims to improve the health of vulnerable women of reproductive age (WRA) in developing countries. The group focuses on the care of mothers at nutritional risk and infants under 6 months (MAMI). We assessed the contribution of maternal nutrition and maternal risk factors to poor infant outcomes. We applied a mixed method approach to assess breastfeeding problems in the 1st month of life, hospital-based studies of infants with severe wasting in the first 6 months of life to improve support breastfeeding inside and outside the hospital (IBAMI1 & 2). We are members of NeoNunet; a collaborative network of Nigerian and Kenyan neonatal units set up to assess evidence of feeding preterm and low birth weight infants.

The VIRUTUBISHO trial aims to optimize nutrient requirements for maternal supplementation. This is a Phase 2b dose-finding pharmacokinetic trial of Balanced Energy Proteins (BEPs) and Multiple Micronutrient Supplements (MMSs). This is a community-based trial that will recruit women of childbearing age from two locations in Kilifi North Sub-County.

The post holder will be based in Kilifi to promote effective trial management and participate in other group activities. They will work with an experienced team of clinical trial coordinators in the broader nutrition research group i.e. CHAIN ​​Network (https://chainnetwork.org/).

MAIN RESPONSIBILITIES:

Administrative monitoring

  • General coordinator of the VIRUTUBISHO trial to oversee the administrative aspects of staffing, project budgeting, procurement and liability, security, health and safety
  • Manage/supervise a team of clinical and field staff working in the VIRUTUBISHO trial
  • Undertake/guide the study risk assessment with the study investigator, maintain a risk register and participate in the development of risk mitigation measures relying on administrative support from KWTRP as per applicable policies and guidelines
  • Lead/guide the resolution of operational challenges/issues affecting the study team
  • Participate in the drafting of project Gantt charts, implementation timelines and identification of milestones and use them to regularly monitor the overall progress of the project.

Coordination of studies

Manage the daily implementation of the VIRUTUBISHO trial.

  • Coordinate the process of ethical and scientific inquiries and renewals of study protocol and trial registration.
  • Manage the development of training plans for the research protocol, as well as general staff recruitment, development trainings and mentoring.
  • Collaborate with scientific leads on the preparation of SOPs, data collection tools (CRF/source documents), quality manuals and processes in accordance with institutional guidelines and international research standards (GCP)
  • Responsible for delivering interventions using Direct Observed Treatment (DOT) to provide Multiple Micronutrient Supplements (MMS) to trial women of reproductive age in Kilifi.
  • Responsible for participant sampling, quality, completeness and transportation of samples from field sites to KWTRP laboratories for processing and storage
  • Responsible for collecting data, reviewing on-site data quality and completeness, and communicating with clinical and field teams on query resolutions
  • Participate in operational and scientific committees and stakeholder forums locally and internationally, such as monthly clinical trial center meetings.
  • Coordinate stakeholder engagement in the VIRUTUBISHO study and maintain a record of completed meetings and planned updates.
  • Facilitate follow-up of clinical and field documentation, review progress and implement follow-up recommendations which may include additional trainings.

QUALIFICATIONS:

Essential:

  • Degree in public health/epidemiology/clinical trials or related fields
  • At least 3 years of experience coordinating a clinical trial, including setting up a trial and working with trial monitors.
  • Computer proficiency in the use of Excel, Ms word and power point sheets
  • Exceptional project management skills, proficiency in project management tools and ability to manage an intensive clinical trial.
  • Demonstrable experience in writing high quality reports and presentations in English, with evidence of attention to detail.
  • Ability to network, communicate, resolve conflicts and maintain good working relationships in a multicultural environment.

Desirable:

  • Community mobilization for a community trial
  • Knowledge of the local context, culture and language is an added advantage

Skills :

  • Demonstrate high levels of integrity and confidentiality
  • Excellent interpersonal, writing, presentation and communication skills
  • Good analytical, problem solving and critical thinking skills;
  • Teamwork and ability to work with diverse teams
  • Strong flexibility, adaptability, multitasking and attention to detail
  • Strong team coordination and supervision skills.

PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT/CONDITIONS:

  • Based at the KEMRI/Wellcome Trust research program in Kilifi, Kenya.
  • Be available to work after hours if necessary.

How to register

To apply for this position, please click on the link below:

Clinical Trials Coordinator – VIRUTUBISHO Trial | Job/training opportunities (kemri-wellcome.org)

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Commanders intend to raise receiver Curtis Samuel https://shox-box.com/commanders-intend-to-raise-receiver-curtis-samuel/ Mon, 01 Aug 2022 17:38:16 +0000 https://shox-box.com/commanders-intend-to-raise-receiver-curtis-samuel/ ASHBURN, Va. (AP) — Ron Rivera said Washington COs plan to step up Curtis Samuel due to some questions about the wide receiver’s level of conditioning following a lost 2021 season. due to a groin injury. Samuel doesn’t suffer from the same injury but, according to the veteran coach, he reported hamstring and back strain […]]]>

ASHBURN, Va. (AP) — Ron Rivera said Washington COs plan to step up Curtis Samuel due to some questions about the wide receiver’s level of conditioning following a lost 2021 season. due to a groin injury.

Samuel doesn’t suffer from the same injury but, according to the veteran coach, he reported hamstring and back strain to head athletic trainer Al Bellamy after the first two practices of training camp. Samuel, who turns 26 on August 11, did not participate in the individual or team drills and instead worked on the side Monday.

“It all depends on the plan,” Rivera said. “He and Al talked a bit, and there were concerns about his overall football fitness and form. You can train all you want, you can condition all you want, but coming back and doing some of the things we want him to do, we have to be smart with that Al and his guys have a plan, and so with Curtis, we’re going to stick to the plan.

The limited groin injury Samuel had six catches in five games last season after signing a three-year, $34.5 million contract with Washington. Last week he said he felt good and fast despite not participating fully in training.

“I just listen to the coaches’ plan and what they’ve done for me,” Samuel said Friday. “My main goal is to stay ready at all times. I don’t pay too much attention to all that. Do you know what I’m saying? We have a plan that we will stick to and it will work.

Samuel was originally signed to give the Washington offense a speed threat to accompany top receiver Terry McLaurin. Going through off-season training sessions made it look like injury woes were behind him.

“I’m flying all over there and I’m able to do things that I used to do, so I’m excited about that,” Samuel said.

With just under six weeks until the season opener against Jacksonville, there’s no cause for alarm yet about Samuel’s availability, and COs would like that to continue.

“We wanted to make sure we got it back the right way,” Rivera said. “You’ll see there will be build-ups and then we’ll slow him down. There will be times when he’ll interact, getting some of the work done at 11v11, stuff like that, but it’s all part of the plan. The ultimate goal really is the regular season more than anything else.

Samuel is entering his sixth season in the NFL. He had 191 catches for 2,114 yards and 14 touchdowns in 58 games with Carolina and Washington.

KERRIGAN HAS A TASTE FOR COACHING

Two days after returning to his former training center to announce his retirement, Washington career sack leader Ryan Kerrigan was back in some sort of coaching capacity. Kerrigan has expressed interest in becoming a coach, and now he has the opportunity to see what he thinks about working with the Commanders defensive wings.

“He wanted to have an idea,” Rivera said, adding that Kerrigan doesn’t have an official title yet. “We’re going to give him a few weeks and then we’ll re-evaluate and re-evaluate and see where he stands.”

___

More AP NFL coverage: https://apnews.com/hub/nfl and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL

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10 things we learned from ‘Back Together Saturday’ https://shox-box.com/10-things-we-learned-from-back-together-saturday/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 00:30:00 +0000 https://shox-box.com/10-things-we-learned-from-back-together-saturday/ 5) The Cowboys could be headed for a running back account. Ezekiel Elliott hasn’t produced according to his contract, and Tony continues to linger in the shadows, waiting for his next occasional chance to produce. Cowboys owner Jerry Jones knows both have value, but he’s also not directing much of the change to Elliott just […]]]>

5) The Cowboys could be headed for a running back account. Ezekiel Elliott hasn’t produced according to his contract, and Tony continues to linger in the shadows, waiting for his next occasional chance to produce. Cowboys owner Jerry Jones knows both have value, but he’s also not directing much of the change to Elliott just for the sake of it.

“Zeke has to be our feature, and he is our feature,” Jones said during an interview on NFL Network. “We can present him in different ways. We all recognize what he does in the passing game because of his protective ability. Never underestimate that, especially with Zeke. Zeke takes tolls when he’s there- down like a back blocker. So it’s critical that we make Zeke – because he’s capable of being that – really the center of what we do.”

It’s an interesting storyline because although Elliott carries pass protection value, Pollard has proven to be a weapon in such scenarios as a wide receiver. Pollard also showed flashes of being a running back capable of shredding a defense. It’s nice to have both there, but given Elliott’s high salary, it doesn’t seem sustainable forever.

It would set up a year of proof for Elliott, a fullback who again topped the 1,000 yard mark last season as part of the NFL’s No. 1 offense but still wasn’t Pro Bowl caliber. that the Cowboys thought they were securing in 2019. The opportunity exists again for Pollard, even if the chances are not frequent. The latter should at least feel good knowing he’s on the owner’s radar. It’s definitely on mine.

6) The Cardinals spare no effort with Isaiah Simmons. Simmons’ main attribute since his Clemson days has been his bizarre athleticism, so it was no surprise to see tweets pouring out from rabid Glendale about Simmons’ ability to keep up with fast receiver Andy Isabella. We know Simmons is fast. We know he can move. But what Simmons hasn’t proven to the footballing world is whether he can turn that into an effective defender.

Arizona seems to have recognized this, making Simmons a hybrid role in the camp that is described with a familiar job title: star. He’s not the same star as Jalen Ramsey in Los Angeles, but he’s one that demands versatility. Simmons would fill the linebacker and safety position in nickel packages, able to cover wide receivers while stopping the run in the box. I see it more as a Rams Mark Barron gig than a gig that will have Simmons dropping pass coverage 50 times a game.

More importantly, the Cardinals need to get legitimate production from Simmons in Year Three. They can’t afford to spend consecutive first rounds on two linebackers and fail to get a quality return on either (the other being Zaven Collins, who started just six games l last year). The league is heading into an era in which we will see more nickel and other subsets than traditional base defenses, so the safety/hybrid linebacker will only become more prevalent. Looks like Arizona is hoping Simmons can be that guy for them for a long time, starting with this camp.

7) The Bengals’ road back to the Super Bowl met with a detour. Joe Burrow underwent an appendectomy on Wednesday and has no set schedule for a return to camp. Zac Taylor had no update on Burrow’s status on Saturday, but said the quarterback hasn’t returned to the facility since then.

“You want to leave it alone to some degree,” Taylor said, via Paul Dehner Jr of The Athletic.

The appendix is ​​essentially a useless organ, so it doesn’t seem like a worrying issue. The biggest hurdle for Burrow might be recovery from surgery more than anything. Still, the timing couldn’t be much worse for a quarterback entering the third year with the goal of getting his team back to the Super Bowl. The Bengals will have to do without him for now.

8) Malik Willis’ adaptation from Liberty to the NFL won’t happen overnight. Willis learned the intensity of the NFL spotlight before he even hit training camp, and people are not ignoring him as he takes on his first NFL practice reps. It seems his coaching staff isn’t either.

Willis appeared to be slow to process and react during Saturday’s camp, especially during non-contact drills (seven-on-seven) in which he held onto the ball longer than usual, by Terry McCormick of TitanInsider.com. Coach Mike Vrabel didn’t hesitate to do so afterward, telling reporters they were working on Willis’ timing as he adjusts to professional play.

Those looking to replace Ryan Tannehill with Willis may have to learn to be patient. It looks like it will be more of a project than quick succession, which should come as no surprise to anyone, given where the Titans selected him (the third round) in April.

9) Philadelphia is no longer waiting for Jalen Reagor to prove he was worth the first-round pick. The Eagles went out and acquired AJ Brown in the offseason to partner 2021 first-rounder DeVonta Smith, and it looks like they’re not looking back to see if Reagor keeps pace.

“Yeah, we have great depth at wide receiver. He’s fighting. He’s fighting for a spot, and he’s working with both right now,” Eagles coach Nick Sirianni said of Reagor on Saturday. . “He’s been hit a lot in the last two days here so he’s done a good job and he’s fighting for a place, he’s fighting for his place back. He’s worked hard in the offseason to come back in great shape. It’s something we all noticed in the conditioning test, how fit Jalen (Hurts) was. Yeah, he’s just fighting for a spot.

Fight for a place. I understood. This battle is going to come up against fierce competition now that Brown has a spot on the roster. Philadelphia remains high on Quez Watkins’ big-play potential, while Zach Pascal has come over from the Colts to add another option for quarterback Jalen Hurts. There just aren’t as many places to go these days; This is no longer your 2020 Eagles receiving corps.

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Pilots describe toxic culture and airline mistakes https://shox-box.com/pilots-describe-toxic-culture-and-airline-mistakes/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 07:02:51 +0000 https://shox-box.com/pilots-describe-toxic-culture-and-airline-mistakes/ The chaos that has engulfed many major airports in North America and Europe since the start of the summer has not abated much, and the media and social media users continue to report hordes of impatient travelers and mountains of misplaced suitcases. Source: Getty Images Canceled flights. Long queues. Staff walkouts. Baggage missing. Sound familiar? […]]]>

The chaos that has engulfed many major airports in North America and Europe since the start of the summer has not abated much, and the media and social media users continue to report hordes of impatient travelers and mountains of misplaced suitcases.

Source: Getty Images

Canceled flights. Long queues. Staff walkouts. Baggage missing.

Sound familiar? The chaos that has engulfed many major airports in North America and Europe since the summer has not abated much, and the media and social media users continue to report hordes of impatient travelers and mountains of lost suitcases.

This week alone, German airline Lufthansa canceled almost all of its flights to Frankfurt and Munich, stranding some 130,000 travelers due to a one-day strike by its ground staff who were on strike for better pay .

London’s Heathrow Airport and Amsterdam Airport Schiphol – two of Europe’s biggest travel hubs – have cut passenger capacity and demanded airlines cut flights to and from their airports, which angered travelers and airline managers.

Carriers in the United States have also canceled and delayed tens of thousands of flights due to staff shortages and weather issues.

Airlines loudly blame airports and governments. On Monday, European low-cost airline Ryanair’s chief financial officer, Neil Sorahan, complained that airports “have a job to do”.

Suitcases not collected at Heathrow Airport. The UK’s biggest airport has asked airlines to stop selling summer tickets.

Paul Ellis | AFP | Getty Images

But many of those working in the industry say airlines are also partly to blame for staff shortages and the situation is becoming serious enough to threaten safety.

CNBC spoke to several pilots flying for major airlines, all of whom described fatigue from long hours and what they said was opportunism and a desire to cut costs as part of a toxic “race to the bottom” culture that pervades the industry and makes the mess worse. situation that travelers face today.

All airline staff spoke anonymously as they were not authorized to speak to the press.

“Absolute Carnage”

“From a passenger perspective, it’s an absolute nightmare,” a pilot for low-cost European airline easyJet told CNBC.

“Before the summer it was absolute carnage because the airlines didn’t know what they were doing. They didn’t have a proper plan in place. All they knew they wanted to do was was trying to fly as much as humanly possible – almost as if the pandemic had never happened,” the pilot said.

“But they forgot that they had cut all their resources.”

The resulting imbalance has “made our lives an absolute mess, both for cabin crew and pilots,” the pilot added, explaining how a shortage of ground staff since the pandemic layoffs – those who s busy with baggage, check-in, security and more – has created a domino effect that disrupts flight schedules.

A bit of toxic soup…airports and airlines share the same level of responsibility.

In a statement, easyJet said the health and well-being of employees is “our top priority”, stressing that “we take our responsibilities as an employer very seriously and employ our employees on local contracts on terms competitively and in accordance with local law”.

The industry is now hampered by a combination of factors: not having enough resources to retrain, former employees unwilling to return, and poor wages that have largely remained suppressed since the budget cuts of the era. of the pandemic, despite a significant improvement in airline revenues.

“They told us pilots that we have pay cuts until at least 2030, except all managers are back with full pay plus pay raises for inflation,” said one. British Airways pilot.

“Various governments with their restrictions and no support for the aviation sector” as well as airport companies are largely responsible for the current chaos, the pilot said, adding that “some airlines took advantage of the situation to cut wages, sign new contracts and lay off workers, and now that things are back to normal, they can’t cope anymore”.

While many airports and airlines are now recruiting and offering better salaries, the required training programs and security clearance processors are also drastically reduced and outdated, further hampering the industry.

“They are shocked, which is unbelievable”

British Airways ground staff were set to go on strike in August over the fact that their full salaries had still not been reinstated – something particularly scathing at a time when the CEO of BA’s parent company, IAG , received a gross subsistence allowance of £250,000 ($303,000). for the year.

But this week the airline and the workers’ union agreed to a pay rise to call off the planned strike, although some employees say it’s still not a full return to their pre-pandemic pay.

Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty Images

In a statement, British Airways said: “The past two years have been devastating for the entire aviation industry. We have taken steps to restructure our business in order to survive and save jobs.”

The company also said “the vast majority of layoffs during this period were voluntary.”

“We are fully focused on building the resilience of our operations to give customers the certainty they deserve,” the airline said.

IAG CEO Luis Gallego, whose company owns BA, lost his £900,000 bonus in 2021 and took voluntary pay cuts in 2020 and 2021, and did not receive his 2020 bonus .

They just want the cheapest labor to produce their own big bonuses and satisfy shareholders.

A pilot flying for Dubai’s flagship airline, Emirates, said a short-term mindset that took employees for granted had for years laid the foundation for the current situation.

The airlines “were happy to try to drive down the wages of many people in the industry for years, assuming nobody had anywhere to go,” the pilot said. “And now that people are exercising their right to go somewhere else, they’re shocked, which is unbelievable. I’m shocked that they’re shocked.”

A security risk?

All of this stress for airline staff is on top of the often overlooked issue of pilot fatigue, all pilots interviewed by CNBC said.

The maximum legal limit for a pilot’s flight time is 900 hours per year. But for many airlines “it wasn’t seen as the absolute maximum, it was the goal of trying to make everyone’s workload as efficient as possible,” the easyJet pilot said.

“That’s the big worry with us is that we have quite a toxic culture, an inordinate amount of work,” echoed the Emirates driver. “All of this contributes to potentially reducing the margin of safety. And that’s a big concern.”

All of this has been combined with low wages and less attractive contracts, say the pilots, many of whom were rewritten when the pandemic upended air travel.

“A bit of a toxic soup of it all, airports and airlines share the same level of responsibility. It’s been a race to the bottom for years,” the Emirates pilot said. “They’re only going to try to pay as little as they can get away with paying.”

Emirates Airline did not respond to a CNBC request for comment.

“Race Down”

“Crony capitalists. Rat race to bottom. No respect for skilled labor now,” the BA pilot said of the industry leadership. “They just want the cheapest labor to produce their own big bonuses and satisfy shareholders.”

The International Air Transport Association said in response to such criticism that “the airline industry is increasing its resources as quickly as possible to safely and efficiently meet the needs of travellers”. He acknowledged that “there is no doubt that times are tough for industrial workers, especially when they are in short supply”.

The trade group issued recommendations “to attract and retain talent in the ground handling industry”, and said in a statement that “obtaining additional resources where gaps exist is among the top priorities of industry leadership teams around the world”.

“And in the meantime,” he added, “the patience of travellers.”

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Director of Monitoring and Evaluation – USAID Cameroon President’s Malaria Initiative Bilateral (Proposal) – Cameroon https://shox-box.com/director-of-monitoring-and-evaluation-usaid-cameroon-presidents-malaria-initiative-bilateral-proposal-cameroon/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 09:06:57 +0000 https://shox-box.com/director-of-monitoring-and-evaluation-usaid-cameroon-presidents-malaria-initiative-bilateral-proposal-cameroon/ For the past 40 years, MCD Global Health (MCD) has worked to strengthen health systems through integrated, sustainable, and locally-led interventions across multiple public health sectors. MCD works with donors, national governments, the private sector, health agencies, communities and local stakeholders to improve health and save lives in the following areas: water, sanitation and hygiene; […]]]>

For the past 40 years, MCD Global Health (MCD) has worked to strengthen health systems through integrated, sustainable, and locally-led interventions across multiple public health sectors. MCD works with donors, national governments, the private sector, health agencies, communities and local stakeholders to improve health and save lives in the following areas: water, sanitation and hygiene; fight against malaria; maternal, newborn and child health; tuberculosis; HIV/AIDS; Zika; and other communicable diseases.

MCD is currently seeking candidates to fill the position of Director of Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) for the planned five-year, bilateral, USAID-funded President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI) project. The project aims to improve access to timely, quality and well-researched malaria testing and treatment by providing community health workers with training and supervision to provide effective, quality care.

The M&E Director will lead the project’s monitoring, evaluation, and operational research efforts. This position must develop monitoring, evaluation and reporting plans, systems and tools that include project indicators, baseline data, targets and a plan to assess performance and produce timely, accurate and timely reports. complete. In addition, this position will contribute to continuously improving project implementation based on M&E findings. This position would also play a key role in supporting the knowledge management of the project and the completion of a learning plan to accomplish the documentation and dissemination of lessons learned and best practices from the project.

This is a key position within the project team and is dependent on successful award to MCD.

Essential duties of the position:

• Work closely with the Chief of Party (COP) to provide technical support in building the capacity of the Ministry of Health and other key government actors and project partners to monitor and evaluate project results;

• Develop and oversee the implementation of the Project Performance Monitoring Plan (PMP) which includes plans for collecting baseline data and setting targets and results that contribute to improving result level indicators to be measured annually by USAID/Cameroon;

• Take primary responsibility for monitoring, evaluation and learning of all project activities, and lead the development of platforms to share lessons learned with GOM and partners, donors and key malaria stakeholders in Cameroon and the region;

• Oversee and lead the development of project M&E systems, procedures and tools;

• Lead all project baseline, mid-term and endline surveys in support of project data collection and analysis to inform project interventions and national policy formulation;

• Ensure the availability and use of high quality data for decision-making;

• Support the COP in the development of M&E sections of quarterly and annual reports, and contribute substantively to the annual planning process with respect to M&E and learning objectives, targets and activities;

• Train and mentor project staff on relevant aspects of monitoring and evaluation of project implementation;

• Contribute to the development and implementation of a strategy for synthesizing and disseminating key findings, lessons learned and other project research and survey findings.

Qualifications, skills and experience required:

• A master’s degree in demography, public health, social sciences or a related field is desirable.

• A minimum of 7 years of direct professional experience in Cameroon or in the West Africa region as a senior expert in monitoring and evaluation in the health/malaria sector;

• Proven expertise in quantitative and qualitative methodologies, operations research, health management information systems, reporting, data quality assessments, data analysis and/or presentation;

• Demonstrated strong management, coordination, teamwork and planning skills, with a proven ability to work effectively with multiple host country counterparts in the public sector and NGOs;

• Demonstrated experience in monitoring and evaluation of malaria and/or health programs, with extensive experience in the design, development and implementation of health data information systems, preferably in Cameroon;

• Familiarity with USAID management and reporting requirements and systems, indicators, and the M&E and Learning (MEL) framework;

• Excellent command of the MS Office suite (Word, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint) and data management and statistics software, for example Stata, SPSS, Epi-info, MS Access;

• Experience in mentoring peers in monitoring and evaluation, database management, data analysis using the software identified above;

• Strong verbal and written communication skills in French and English;

• Previous work experience in Cameroon is strongly preferred. Preference would be given to Cameroonian nationals.

Location: Yaoundé, Cameroon Schedule: Grade 11 full-time

How to register

Interested candidates should submit a letter of interest and resume to bdjobs@mcd.org by August 31, 2022. Remuneration will be based on USAID FSN scales.

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TC Sheriff at forefront of NYS law enforcement reinvention https://shox-box.com/tc-sheriff-at-forefront-of-nys-law-enforcement-reinvention/ Sat, 23 Jul 2022 06:28:52 +0000 https://shox-box.com/tc-sheriff-at-forefront-of-nys-law-enforcement-reinvention/ The Tompkins County Sheriff’s Department, which recently launched its Unarmed Sheriff’s Clerk pilot program, is at the forefront of New York State’s efforts to reinvent law enforcement operations. Effective July 5, Tompkins County civilians Sam Pulliam and Tara Richardson began their full-time roles as unarmed sheriff’s clerks. Although still considered “in training,” the duo began […]]]>

The Tompkins County Sheriff’s Department, which recently launched its Unarmed Sheriff’s Clerk pilot program, is at the forefront of New York State’s efforts to reinvent law enforcement operations.

Effective July 5, Tompkins County civilians Sam Pulliam and Tara Richardson began their full-time roles as unarmed sheriff’s clerks. Although still considered “in training,” the duo began taking non-emergency calls for the Tompkins County Sheriff’s Office.

Comparable programs have begun to spring up in other cities across the United States, including Denver, San Francisco and Portland, though many of these pilot programs are aimed at deflecting mental health-related calls from armed police officers.

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US Innovation Bill clears major hurdle in Senate with research provisions intact | Science https://shox-box.com/us-innovation-bill-clears-major-hurdle-in-senate-with-research-provisions-intact-science/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 17:26:38 +0000 https://shox-box.com/us-innovation-bill-clears-major-hurdle-in-senate-with-research-provisions-intact-science/ A massive bill to boost innovation in the United States took a big step toward becoming law this week after a bipartisan coalition of senators defeated an attempt to cut most of its research components. The latest version of the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act (USICA) also includes new language requiring the National Science Foundation […]]]>

A massive bill to boost innovation in the United States took a big step toward becoming law this week after a bipartisan coalition of senators defeated an attempt to cut most of its research components. The latest version of the U.S. Innovation and Competition Act (USICA) also includes new language requiring the National Science Foundation (NSF) and Department of Energy (DOE) to distribute their research dollars more evenly across the country.

Tuesday’s 64-34 vote represents a major victory for Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D–NY) and President Joe Biden, who have repeatedly urged Congress to pass legislation that would address growing investments by China in many emerging technologies. But it wouldn’t have been possible without the support of 16 Republicans, who stood up to their leadership to back changes that would benefit universities in their states.

The impetus for USICA was a proposal by Schumer in 2020 to authorize the spending of $100 billion over 5 years for a new directorate of technologies at the NSF that would help commercialize the basic research it funds. Over time, other research agencies have been added to the mix, including tens of billions of dollars in additional spending authority for the DOE’s Office of Science and a small increase for the National Institute of Standards and technology. Lawmakers also set a $52 billion subsidy for the semiconductor industry — real money, as opposed to authorized spending levels for science agencies — as well as numerous trade and security provisions.

The Senate passed USICA in June 2021, with support from 19 Republicans. In February, a bill with similar goals, called America COMPETES, passed the House of Representatives, although only one Republican supported it. This sparked negotiations between the two bodies to reconcile their differences.

Lawmakers were close to reaching a final deal last month when top Senate Republican Mitch McConnell (KY) ordered his team to stop talking with Democrats. McConnell saw the shutdown as a bargaining chip in his continued opposition to several of the Biden administration’s priorities, though many Republicans also opposed the spending — more than $250 billion — authorized in the bill. law. McConnell then gave consent for Schumer to move forward with legislation dealing only with the semiconductor industry, dubbed the CHIPS Act.

Schumer did not want to abandon the bill’s array of research provisions, which included a 5-year doubling of the NSF’s budget and a $20 billion investment in new management as well as a $10 billion network. dollars from regional technology centers funded by the Department of Commerce. . But he needed at least a dozen Republicans on his side to stop McConnell from using a filibuster to stop the bigger package, called CHIPS-plus, from coming to the vote. He got them through the work of his Republican co-sponsor, Sen. Todd Young (IN).

A major selling point for Republicans was the bill’s provisions requiring greater geographic, racial and institutional allocation of research dollars by the NSF and DOE’s office of science. The goal remains, but the wording has been changed from what the Senate passed last year to address concerns by many scholars that it was too prescriptive.

The earlier USICA version would have allocated 20% of the NSF’s total $8.5 billion budget and 20% of the DOE’s science office’s $7.5 billion budget to the agencies’ established program to stimulate research. competitive (EPSCoR). The program, which distributes its own grants to help states build research capacity, serves 28 jurisdictions (25 states; Washington, DC; Puerto Rico; and the US Virgin Islands) that receive minimal federal funding for research.

Proponents said the additional funding would level the playing field for resource-strapped institutions. But many universities that are not in EPSCoR states have fought the provision, saying it would unfairly prevent them from competing and distort NSF’s overall research portfolio by requiring a nearly 10-fold increase in the budget of EPSCoR, now $215 million. (The DOE operates a $25 million per year EPSCoR program.)

The new CHIPS-plus wording retains a quota but revises how the money will be allocated. Instead of giving it to EPSCoR itself, which distributes its own grants to help states build research capacity, the NSF and DOE have been ordered to increase the amount of money flowing to institutions. of these states through their regular competitive pricing process.

“These revisions will minimize the administrative impact on implementation…and maximize the impact of policy change where it matters, on actual research,” says Sen. Roger Wicker (R–MS), who drafted the provisions. initials.

The NSF would be required to increase its allocation of research funds to institutions in EPSCoR jurisdictions from the current level of approximately 13% to 20% by 2029. A similar target of 20%, to be achieved by 2025, would would apply to all types of NSF fellowships and training programs. DOE science programs should allocate at least 10% of their budget to EPSCoR state institutions.

The wording of the bill recognizes that these targets may be overstated. Both agencies are asked to do so “whenever possible,” and if the NSF fails, the director must explain why and come up with a plan to close the gap.

CHIPS-plus includes further provisions to authorize the spending of hundreds of millions of dollars each year on new programs aimed at building the research capacity of institutions that currently receive relatively little federal funding. This list includes historically black colleges and universities and those serving large numbers of underrepresented students, as well as predominantly white institutions that rank outside the top 100 recipients of federal research funds.

These provisions remain unchanged from those of USICA and COMPETES, although the House bill explicitly avoided quotas for fear of distorting the NSF’s much-admired system of awarding competitive grants.

Senator Maria Cantwell (D-WA), who led the Senate contingent negotiating the terms of the compromise legislation, champions the importance of greater geographic distribution. “You don’t want there to be holes in our research business,” she said. Science the day after the election. “You never know where that next big hit, or the next Bill Gates, will come from. So the key is to build capacity across the country.

His fellow House negotiator, Rep. Eddie Bernice Johnson (D–TX), acknowledges that the latest USICA version does not include some things House Democrats wanted in the bill. “Compromises had to be made,” says Johnson, who is retiring this year after 32 years of service. “Not everyone will get everything they originally wanted, including me. But I hope all of my colleagues will come together…and get this legislation passed.

Tuesday’s vote wasn’t actually on the new language. Rather, it was a test vote on whether the CHIPS-plus package had enough support to move forward. A bill incorporating the actual text could be tabled in the Senate as early as next week. If approved, it would then go to the House for a positive or negative vote.

House Democrats believe they have the votes to pass it and send it to Biden, who has repeatedly urged Congress to act quickly on what he called the Bipartisan Innovation Act.

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Sara Hall, Emma Bates and Keira D’Amato in women’s marathon top 10 https://shox-box.com/sara-hall-emma-bates-and-keira-damato-in-womens-marathon-top-10/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 00:16:00 +0000 https://shox-box.com/sara-hall-emma-bates-and-keira-damato-in-womens-marathon-top-10/ Comment this story Comment EUGENE, Ore. — At a finish line she wasn’t sure she’d reach a few hours earlier, at the end of a race she didn’t know she was running a few weeks ago, Keira D’Amato saw two teammates waiting for her. Sara Hall and Emma Bates raised their hands above their heads […]]]>

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EUGENE, Ore. — At a finish line she wasn’t sure she’d reach a few hours earlier, at the end of a race she didn’t know she was running a few weeks ago, Keira D’Amato saw two teammates waiting for her. Sara Hall and Emma Bates raised their hands above their heads and smiled. D’Amato smiled back, stretched his arms and ran into their embrace.

The Americans, including two mothers in their late thirties, entered the world championship marathon as three of the 10 fastest marathon runners in the world. For about 2 hours 20 minutes, Hall, Bates and D’Amato ran alongside each other, feasted on cheers and smiled more frequently than most people running 26.2 miles would reasonably dare to. .

Hall, a 39-year-old Californian, finished fifth in 2 hours 22 minutes 10 seconds – 3:59 behind champion Gotytom Gebreslase of Ethiopia (2:18:11). Bates, a 30-year-old who idolized Hall growing up in Minnesota, set a personal best finishing seventh in 2:23:18. D’Amato finished eighth in 2:23:34, a gargantuan feat considering his preparation.

Two weeks ago, Olympic bronze medalist Molly Seidel retired with an injury. D’Amato, who set the American record in January after a seven-year hiatus that included the birth of her two children, had trained for a 10-kilometre race – about 20 miles shorter than a marathon – but accepted instantly when offered Seidel’s place. She had never raced wearing a Team USA uniform. Thomas and Quin, her son and daughter, held signs and watched their mother fulfill an unlikely dream.

“I was so proud of us,” D’Amato said. “Being the caboose of Team USA and finishing eighth is really great. It was a really cool hug.

She had defied convention her entire career. A graduate of Oakton High, D’Amato turned pro as a miler after four all-American seasons at American. Injuries pushed her into retirement and a job as a realtor in 2009. She attempted her first marathon in 2013, and it went so badly she thought she wouldn’t try one. another. She had Thomas the following year, then Quin two years later.

She returned to distance running as a break from motherhood and gave marathons another shot. In 2017, she ran one in 2:47, a rarity for distance runners. D’Amato called his old trainer and worked his way into the elite distance circuit. In January, in a performance that stunned running circles, D’Amato broke the American record, resetting it to 2:19:12. She refuses a training program that takes her away from her children. She still works as a real estate agent.

Why, then, would making his first national team happen normally? On July 1, D’Amato received a call asking if she would replace Seidel. As a child, she watched the Olympics and imagined wearing “USA” on her chest. Her husband, Tony, served in the military for 16 years and remains a member of the Air National Guard. Now she could represent the United States in a different way.

“How can I say no? D’Amato said. “It’s been a dream of mine since I was in CM1: to wear red, white and blue.”

“I was crying,” Tony D’Amato said. “I know how much it means to her, how much it means to her family. When she got the call, I knew right away what her answer would be. She would never refuse that. Never. It’s a dream come true. It’s a gift.”

It was a challenging gift. Normally, it would take her two or three months to train for a marathon. If she did the normal runs she would do in the weeks leading up to a marathon, she would risk getting tired and injured.

She is 37 years old. Mom of two children. And America’s fastest marathon runner.

Three days after joining the team, D’Amato has covered 22 miles. She knew she had retained some of her fitness after setting the American record six months ago. She ran between 60 and 70 miles in every week she had.

Meanwhile, Tony engaged in his own preparation. He had a National Guard exercise the weekend after D’Amato joined the team, followed by a work trip to Denver. While Thomas and Quin stayed with his parents and D’Amato trained, Tony was looking for last-minute plane tickets and hotels for eight family members.

“They’re like, ‘You know, you’re not giving us a lot of time to plan this trip,'” D’Amato said. “I’m like, ‘I have to run a marathon! I don’t feel bad for you trying to get plane tickets, okay? ”

“Probably overspent in some areas,” Tony said. “But we didn’t care.”

D’Amato’s mother, Liane MacDowell, found a rental so close to the course that they could almost see it from the front yard. They used it as a base to shuttle between viewpoints along the loop. “There was an angel who gave us this Airbnb,” MacDowell said.

At dawn on Monday, D’Amato marched with her teammates to the starting area. Hall turned to Bates and D’Amato. “Hey,” she said, “we want to work together, don’t we?”

D’Amato and Bates eagerly agreed. For the first half of the race, the trio ran alongside each other, helping to set each other’s pace. Their bond went beyond the course.

In 2015, Hall and her husband, Ryan, adopted four Ethiopian sisters, now ages 11, 14, 18 and 22. She had never trained for a marathon this summer, which meant she never trained when her kids were away. school. When she returned from practice runs, rather than enjoying the quiet, she had to be present as a parent.

As the United States dominates the world championships, Devon Allen is heartbroken

“It’s tough,” Hall said. “We can sometimes make it seem like it’s easy, but it’s a constant, trying to do well at the same time and being present as a parent and also wanting to give everything to the sport. Sometimes it’s impossible to do both.

“She didn’t take the elaborate halftime show that I had,” D’Amato said. “But we are both mothers. We are both in our late thirties. We are both very proud to be able to represent the United States, represent mothers, represent women.

About a mile before the end of the second lap, Hall decided to try for a medal and escaped. She ran a mile in 4:57, a faster pace than she wanted to, so spurred on by the crowd. At one point, she passed her daughters on the rail and clapped their hands.

“It’s the most fun I’ve ever had in a marathon,” Hall said. “I wanted to smile as much as possible at first, because you know it will eventually turn into a grimace. But I was smiling even on the last lap.

Bates considers Hall and D’Amato inspirations. She wants to have kids one day, and she plans to ask the two for advice on how to balance motherhood and running. “Just the fact that they can come back not just running but doing even better is something I admired them for,” Bates said. “I want to be more than a runner. They do.

On the third and final loop through the neighborhoods around Autzen Stadium, Bates passed D’Amato and felt a personal best. At the finish line of his first world championships, Bates saw his idol waiting for him and the clock showed 2:23:18, his best time ever. It was surreal.

D’Amato had a more difficult journey to the finish. She’d laughed every time she thought about running a marathon on two weeks’ notice. When the day arrived, she wondered if she would end up for “a little bit of everything,” she said. Sometimes his body was throwing up fluids. At the end of the second lap, the crowd gathered around the eventual finish line to urge the riders.

“I thought, ‘Maybe that’s it? Maybe?’ “D’Amato said. “I started getting a little delusional, like, ‘Maybe they’ll just cut us off. We don’t need another loop. I was afraid to look at my watch and see.

D’Amato slowed his pace but continued to grind. His family moved around the course. They looked at her and shouted for her at the five kilometer mark, then rushed to the finish line.

“We thought we were going to have to get the kids back,” MacDowell said. “As soon as Keira passed, we fired, and we couldn’t even follow the children. We did it here before the first place. It’s good DNA.

As D’Amato walked through, she saw the signs Quin and Thomas were holding – “Come on mom!” – and kissed Bates and Hall.

“It’s a lifetime experience they’ll never forget,” Tony said. “It’s also important for them to see the hard work it takes to get to that elite level. These are life lessons you will never forget.

About half an hour later, her family lingered on arrival. Five-year-old Quin sat on the shoulders of a family member. Thomas, 7, sucked on a big red star-shaped lollipop and reflected on how he felt looking at his mum.

“She is the eighth best runner in the whole world,” Thomas said. “She’s amazing. She’s awesome.”

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Maine Voices: Don’t let the UMS fury distract you from the task at hand https://shox-box.com/maine-voices-dont-let-the-ums-fury-distract-you-from-the-task-at-hand/ Sun, 17 Jul 2022 08:00:57 +0000 https://shox-box.com/maine-voices-dont-let-the-ums-fury-distract-you-from-the-task-at-hand/ Unsurprisingly, the University of Maine system board’s decision to extend Chancellor Malloy’s contract has led to further controversy. Unfortunately, the negative comments made at the top turned into inappropriate criticism of the whole system. As a state, we can be proud of our university. We must also worry about its future. The UMaine system is […]]]>

Unsurprisingly, the University of Maine system board’s decision to extend Chancellor Malloy’s contract has led to further controversy. Unfortunately, the negative comments made at the top turned into inappropriate criticism of the whole system.

As a state, we can be proud of our university. We must also worry about its future.

The UMaine system is a wonderful, dynamic resource for Maine residents, providing affordable, quality undergraduate and graduate education. It has exceptional faculty and staff who create cutting-edge programs. Having participated in several, I can attest to the quality.

More than 30,000 students participate each year. Most are from Maine, but more and more students from other states and countries are also participating. Some will decide to call Maine home. We need them.

The university system is an economic engine that is integral to an informed and skilled workforce as well as innovation, research and entrepreneurship. More than tax incentives and other social benefits, high-paying jobs are located where there are enough skilled workers.

Public universities also have a mission to have an impact on the community. UMS campuses make their facilities available to the public, cater to non-traditional students, offer employee training at affordable corporate prices, and more.

No other single institution in our state plays all of these important roles.

Nonetheless, the campuses continue to be characterized as competing and self-serving fiefdoms. System administrators are seen as controlling and isolated bureaucrats. Administrators are described as disconnected. These stereotypes are unfair and do not reflect the very real issues at the root of the problem, which go beyond who is chancellor.

The university system faces profound changes in economics, demographics, education delivery, competition, and costs. It’s not alone. Colleges and universities across the country are grappling with the same issues. Dozens have closed in recent years.

Did we see these big challenges coming? Yes. Decades ago, we understood the future demographics of northern New England. We accurately predicted which sectors would be in trouble for skilled workers. We knew that a vast infrastructure of seven college campuses, seven community college campuses, plus adult education in Maine would eventually exceed the state’s ability to pay. We assumed that increased competition would emerge, and it has. But it was no easier then to change course.

Today, the pace of change has accelerated even beyond those forecasts. Time is not on our side.

UMS has taken steps to counter the financial difficulties. Campuses are working hard to attract out-of-state students, specialize their offerings, offer statewide online courses, consolidate administrative functions, upgrade infrastructure, partner with businesses and relentlessly pursue donations.

Despite these efforts, the system remains a financial house of cards. The problem is existential.

Certainly, the solution requires a chancellor with expansive leadership qualities. But this is not enough. It also requires the courage and cooperation of governors, legislators, administrators, faculty, and communities to come together and work toward a common vision for higher education—all assets—that benefits the whole world. ‘State. It includes coordinated public and private investments and takes full advantage of the unique characteristics of campuses – both physical and virtual.

The alternative is a public higher education system that cannibalizes and competes for dwindling numbers of students and resources. On this trajectory, we can see the end of the game. Avoiding this downward spiral will require leadership, clear goals, collaboration, high-level execution, patience, and increased and sustained investment in a longer-term plan.

In some ways, perhaps, the controversy surrounding the Chancellor has been beneficial in refocusing our attention on issues that have been growing insidiously for many years. Undoubtedly, the university of the future, in Maine and everywhere else, will be very different from the university of the past. What we do today will determine that future. We are at an inflection point.

The University of Maine system is a valuable asset that can play a central and catalytic role in the future of our state. Being critical and expressing disagreement is both important and necessary. Nor should it distract or deter us from supporting this system in any way possible.


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How PCPs can anticipate cognitive decline in their patients https://shox-box.com/how-pcps-can-anticipate-cognitive-decline-in-their-patients/ Fri, 15 Jul 2022 06:54:36 +0000 https://shox-box.com/how-pcps-can-anticipate-cognitive-decline-in-their-patients/ Early detection using modern tools is necessary to improve the quality of life of your patients In less than 15 years, the population of people aged 65 and older in the United States is expected to reach 80 million, up from less than 55 million in 2019, according to US Census projections. Unfortunately, years of […]]]>

Early detection using modern tools is necessary to improve the quality of life of your patients

In less than 15 years, the population of people aged 65 and older in the United States is expected to reach 80 million, up from less than 55 million in 2019, according to US Census projections. Unfortunately, years of life gained are often associated with health-related disability. As part of the United Nations Decade of Healthy Aging (2021-2030), there is global momentum to foster healthy aging and add life to years.

Neurological disorders, such as stroke, Parkinson’s disease and dementia, are the leading cause of disability worldwide. The WHO predicts that brain-related disabilities will account for half of the global economic impact of disability by 2030. Dementia is the disability American adults fear most and Alzheimer’s disease is the most feared type of dementia. more frequent. Currently, more than 10 percent of people age 65 and older and about a third of people age 80 and older have Alzheimer’s disease, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. Promoting brain health is key to adding life in years.

Unfortunately, the current state of brain care delivers too little too late, failing to promote brain health and prevent or minimize the impact of brain-related disabilities. To improve care and manage growing needs, the following challenges must be addressed:

The current approach to brain health is largely reactive with minimal attention paid to preventing cognitive decline and promoting cognitive resilience. Brain care usually only becomes a priority if a patient or family member raises a concern, which delays diagnosis and shortens the window of opportunity for intervention, especially given patients’ reluctance to do share their concerns (e.g., because of stigma). The approach to heart health or cancer screening illustrates the power and promise of a different and more proactive approach to brain health.

Primary care providers (PCPs) face practical barriers to performing more systematic screening.A recent survey by the Alzheimer’s Association found that almost all PCPs (96%) think it’s important to assess patients aged 60 and over for cognitive impairment, but they currently perform assessments for half (48%). Among the top barriers, 72% of PCPs said they have trouble differentiating pathological cognitive impairment from normal aging and 47% say they lack the expertise to perform cognitive assessments. PCPs also report a lack of access to cognitive tests and the resources and time to administer them. Taken together, PCPs are not well equipped to screen and monitor patients with cognitive impairment at present.

Limited access to specialized resources for a specific diagnosis leads to delays in initiating care plans. Unfortunately, there is a significant shortage of specialists, which often leads to wait times of three to nine months to see one. Many patients might not need specialist referral if PCPs were better equipped to provide diagnostic and management services, especially to patients with uncomplicated cases of dementia and other diseases of the brain. brain.

Early detection of cognitive impairments and specific diagnoses, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI), offers several opportunities to benefit individuals and their families:

Impact the cognitive trajectory through lifestyle and health interventions. Research shows that preserving brain function and building cognitive resilience is a lifelong endeavor. A growing body of evidence also suggests that interventions addressing modifiable risk factors, such as obesity, hearing and/or visual impairment, nicotine use, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, impaired mood, medication side effects, poor diet, sleep disturbances, lack of exercise and/or loneliness may help mitigate the risk of cognitive impairment and progression to dementia (see Lancet Commission 2020, FINGER study 2015). Encouragingly, in a 2022 Lifebrain survey, 70% of people said that memory issues would be a key motivation for them to improve their lifestyle (under the guidance of their healthcare team). These results underscore the need for a greater emphasis on prevention and the implementation of personalized interventions as early as possible.

Plan what matters most. Early diagnosis allows patients and their families to define their future goals and plan for them (i.e. live the life they choose based on what matters most to them specifically). A survey by the Alzheimer’s Association found that 85% of older adults in the United States want to know early if they have Alzheimer’s disease, citing their top two reasons as the ability to plan with their family and get a earlier treatment (both 70%).

Get timely care and access to clinical trials. Clear and early diagnosis helps ensure that therapies can be implemented much earlier, during the windows of opportunity where the greatest improvements are possible. It also gives patients time to consider enrolling in clinical studies, allowing researchers to follow them longitudinally and develop objective measures of target engagement for new treatments.

PCPs are well positioned to partner with individuals and their families to promote brain health, identify cognitive impairment early, and ensure interventions are aligned with what matters most to each patient. To do this, PCPs need new tools. Fortunately, the landscape of cognitive assessments is changing rapidly as technology advances, technology adoption among older adults increases, and external events – as exemplified by the COVID-19 pandemic – drive innovation.

There are several limitations to traditional cognitive screening tools. Paper-based assessments require manual workflows, involve subjective scoring and interpretation, and offer only limited information about a person’s cognitive abilities, making them neither efficient nor scalable. Additionally, larger neuropsychological batteries are required for confirmatory diagnosis and the process of performing these tests and obtaining the results can be time-consuming and labor-intensive and, therefore, can introduce unnecessary delays in the clinical decision-making process.

Digital cognitive assessments are creating a new space for proactive screening and intervention in primary care. AI-based assessments that measure performance on a range of tasks and analyze a wide range of metrics offer the potential for early detection and specific diagnosis, detecting subtle signs of cognitive impairment in sub -preclinical types of AD and MCI. These tools are also much more efficient, can integrate easily into primary care workflows, and may not require physician administration. Automated scoring and immediate interpretation frees up more time for PCPs to focus on next steps for the patient, which some digital solutions also help with integrated clinical decision support.

More widespread use of digital cognitive assessments can benefit patients, providers, and the entire healthcare system. Digital solutions deliver value to PCPs by improving both cognitive assessment rates and practice workflows, while providing new revenue opportunities. They can be effectively integrated into annual well visits, establishing reliable practice for cognitive screening, and they can help PCPs take advantage of new Medicare reimbursement codes for cognitive assessment and care planning, which have been underutilized to date. Additionally, in a value-based world of health care delivery, simplified assessments offer the potential to help prevent complications requiring urgent or acute care by quickly identifying those most at risk. By enabling broader and more effective screening, digital assessments can help facilitate earlier and more impactful interventions, more efficient triage to specialists, and opportunities for patients to participate in clinical trials.

It’s never too early, but it’s also never too late, to impact individual cognitive trajectories and reduce the risk of brain disability and dementia for patients. Gaining a deeper understanding of new approaches to digital brain health assessments can empower PCPs to help their patients stay ahead of cognitive decline and transform human health.

Alvaro Pascual-Leone, MD, PhD is Chief Medical Officer of Linus Health, Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School, Principal Investigator at the Hinda and Arthur Marcus Institute for Aging Research, and Medical Director of the Deanna and Sidney Wolk Center for Memory Health at Hebrew SeniorLife.

Ankur Bharija, MD is vice president of geriatrics at Linus Health and assistant professor and practicing geriatrician, primary care and population health, at Stanford University School of Medicine.

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