Premier League: only FIVE clubs have abandoned single-use plastic water bottles – SPECIAL FILE

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More than half of Premier League clubs still use environmentally damaging single-use plastic water bottles, a Sportsmail investigation has found.

Of the top 20 teams, only five told this newspaper that they no longer use the ocean-clogging products on their training grounds, which runs counter to green initiatives and that Greenpeace UK has described as “shocking”.

Much has been said about the competition’s commitment to protecting the planet, and it was only this week that the Premier League announced that it is committed to the United Nations Sports Framework for Action. the climate.

More than half of Premier League clubs still use environmentally damaging single-use plastic water bottles, Sportsmail investigation found

In September, Tottenham faced Chelsea in what was billed as “the world’s first net zero carbon football game at an elite level”.

But the London teams are two of 13 clubs who have responded that single-use bottles are still on their training grounds – although both say they are taking action to reduce use.

The other 11 are Crystal Palace, the two clubs Manchester, Liverpool, Norwich City, Brighton, West Ham, Aston Villa, Arsenal, Burnley and Wolves. All say they are reducing use.

A top club insider said the much-touted green initiatives “border on hypocrisy.” They added: “They say they do this and that, but some training grounds are absolute carnage, with players regularly taking a sip from a bottle, throwing it on the grass and then picking up another fresh one when. they need another drink. “

Of the top 20 teams, only five told the newspaper that they no longer use ocean-clogging products on their training grounds.

Of the top 20 teams, only five told the newspaper that they no longer use ocean-clogging products on their training grounds.

Leeds, Leicester, Everton, Brentford and Newcastle United say single-use bottles are not on their training grounds.

Instead, players are given personalized bottles that are refilled. In some clubs, such as Leeds, players have two bottles: one for water and one for supplements.

Nina Schrank, senior plastics activist at Greenpeace UK, called for more action. “As football seems to be slowly waking up to the environmental crisis, clubs need to do a lot more to limit their plastic waste,” she said. ‘It’s shocking. These single-use plastic bottles harm nature and people, so it is essential that this practice is phased out.

“Moving away from our throwaway culture is the only way to solve the plastic crisis,” she added. “Clubs should lead the charge on this and inspire all their supporters to do the same rather than being left behind.”

In September, Tottenham faced Chelsea in what was billed as 'the world's first net zero carbon football game at elite level' - but both sides still use plastic bottles

In September, Tottenham faced Chelsea in what was billed as ‘the world’s first net zero carbon football game at elite level’ – but both sides still use plastic bottles

Work to reduce use appears to be widespread and many parties, including Chelsea and Liverpool, have recycling plants at their training grounds.

Arsenal said that prior to Covid their Colney training center was “almost entirely free of plastic bottles” and added that if they were to reintroduce them to mitigate risk, they are 100% recyclable. Liverpool players each have their own refillable water bottles and individual bottles are collected and recycled where possible.

Manchester United players have their own bottles, but the club use “a small amount” of single-use bottles, while others, including City, have a “zero landfill policy”.

Chelsea are on the verge of completing the switch to canned water, given it’s easier to recycle, while Villa says it will soon switch to individual bottles allocated to players and football staff. Spurs say on home game days their players drink water from cartons, while Wolves say 85% of their waste is recycled.

The other 11 are Crystal Palace, the two clubs Manchester, Liverpool, Norwich City, Brighton, West Ham, Aston Villa, Arsenal, Burnley and Wolves

The other 11 are Crystal Palace, the two clubs Manchester, Liverpool, Norwich City, Brighton, West Ham, Aston Villa, Arsenal, Burnley and Wolves

Norwich players have their own reusable plastic bottles, but sometimes use single-use alternatives for supplements.

Brighton is using a specialist supplier whose bottles are made from recycled plastic, while Palace says they have installed hydro-cooling taps at the training ground. West Ham said all bottles at their training ground were recycled, while Burnley said they planned a number of initiatives. Southampton and Watford did not respond.

A Premier League spokesperson said: “A lot of progress has already been made, but there is still a long way to go. We are committed to raising awareness for sustainability.”


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